Books

Book cover
Published Feb. 26, 2020 3:11 PM

Norway supports the protection of the Amazon rainforest with billions of kroner, but at the same time, through Norwegian companies, the Norwegian Petroleum Fund's investments and Norwegian salmon farming, we spend much more money on what is destroying the rainforest than on protecting it. In this book, Torkjell Leira reveals Norway’s role in the Amazon, and he sheds new light on the emissions scandal that hit Hydro in 2018.

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Published Oct. 16, 2019 2:14 PM

This book by Vegard Bye analyzes the economic reforms and political adjustments that took place in Cuba during the era of Raúl Castro’s leadership and its immediate aftermath, the first year of his successor, Miguel Díaz-Canel. Faced with economic challenges and a political crisis of legitimacy now that the Castro brothers are no longer in power, the Cuban Revolution finds itself at another critical juncture, confronted with the loss of Latin American allies and a more hostile and implacable US administration.

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Published May 22, 2019 11:04 AM

Based on intensive fieldwork with local groups in Oaxaca Mexico in 2015, Alexander Dunlap, University of Oslo, in this book demonstrates the complications and problems that emerge with the current regime of ‘sustainable development’ and wind energy projects in Mexico. Wind energy development, in Mexico and most countries, fall into a ‘roll out’ neoliberal strategy that is justified by climate change mitigation programs that are continuing a process of land and wind resources grabbing for profit. The result has been an exaggeration of pre-existing problems in communities around land, income-inequality, local politics and, contrary to public relations stories, is has been devastating to traditional livelihoods and socio-ecological relationships.

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Published Nov. 7, 2016 4:02 PM

This book, edited by Hein B. Bjerck, Heidi Mjelva Breivik, Silje E. Fretheim, Birgitte Skar, all from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and Argentinian researchers Ernesto L. Piana, Angélica M. Tivoli and A. Francisco J. Zangrando, comes out of a research project focusing on the similarities and differences in the cultural developments in two coastal areas, on different sides of the world, but also with many common features: Seascapes of Patagonia and Scandinavia. It brings together an international collection of papers in which human-sea relations are analyzed through various temporal and spatial scales.

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Published June 7, 2016 1:50 PM

This book, edited by Elin Skaar, Chr. Michelsen Institute; Jemima Garcia-Godos, University of Oslo; and Cath Collins, addresses current developments in transitional justice in Latin America – effectively the first region to undergo concentrated transitional justice experiences in modern times. Using a comparative approach, it examines trajectories in truth, justice, reparations, and amnesties in countries emerging from periods of massive violations of human rights and humanitarian law.

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Published Dec. 17, 2015 1:21 PM

This book, edited by Kari Soriano Salkjelsvik, University of Bergen, and Felipe Martínez-Pinzón, Brown University, is a compilation of articles focusing on the costumbrismo of the nineteenth-century as a discourse that mediated and responded to the processes of modernization in Latin America. The works included here are approaching the costumbrismo discussing aesthetic, cultural and political questions of different Latin American traditions - Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela - also entering into dialogue with Spain.

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Published Nov. 4, 2015 5:46 PM

Is there such a thing as a Norwegian social science perspective on Latin America? Invited by the Latin American Council of Social Sciences, twelve Norway-based scholars have contributed to shed light on Norwegian research and writing on the region from before social sciences were really established in Norway, and up to our days. The book is edited by Benedicte Bull, University of Oslo. See the book at CLACSO’s web site (touch the "pdf"-button for the complete text).

Published Oct. 22, 2015 2:12 PM

Nelson Gonzalez-Ortega, University of Oslo, has editied this book, which collects studies with different research approaches and theoretical perspectives: economic history, sociology, political science and literature. The book aims to answer questions related to the production, transport, consumption and prohibition / criminalization and public attitudes towards illegal drugs and their social representations in literature, journalism, television, film, architecture, religion and music in Colombia, Mexico and Brazil.

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Published June 10, 2015 9:30 AM

In this book the authors, Elin Skaar and Camila Gianella Malca, Chr. Michelsen Institute, and Trine Eide, Arctic University of Norway, examine the effects of transitional justice on the development of peace and democracy. Addressing trials, reparations, truth commissions, and amnesties, the book systematically addresses the experiences of four very different contemporary transitional justice cases: post-authoritarian Uruguay and Peru and post-conflict Rwanda and Angola.

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Published Dec. 12, 2014 5:30 PM

This book, edited by Ana Beatriz Chiquito and Miguel Ángel Quesada Pacheco, is the result of a research project they have headed at the University of Bergen: “Linguistic Identity and Attitudes in Spanish-speaking Latin America”. The project has studied how native speakers of Spanish identify with the Spanish they speak, their loyalty to it, and the social prejudice, acceptability or stigma associated with it and with the type of Spanish spoken in other Hispanic countries. The book brings together the studies conducted in twenty Spanish speaking countries by research teams from each of these countries.

Published Nov. 10, 2014 6:13 PM

The recent rise in Latin America of progressive, left-leaning governments – often supported by groups struggling for environmental justice – has challenged the established elites and raised expectations about new regimes for natural resource management. Based on case-studies in eight Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Colombia, Bolivia, El Salvador and Guatemala), this book, edited by Benedicte Bull and Mariel Cristina Aguilar-Støen, University of Oslo, investigates the extent to which there have been elite shifts, how new governments have related to old elites, and how that has impacted on environmental governance and the management of natural resources.

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