Seeds of Adaptation in the Face of Climate Change (completed)

This project studies the role of agrobiodiversity in adapting to climate change in Sub Saharan Africa. The project includes both a natural science perspective (genetic characterization and analysis) and a social science perspective (analyzing the role of the seed systems).

About the project

Agrobiodiversity and crop genetic resources are among the most fundamental assets supporting rural livelihoods in Africa. Agrobiodiversity commonly functions as a buffer to climatic stress as risks are spread over a broader portfolio of crop species and varieties. Climate change is predicted to exacerbate already existing climatic stress and there is a need for increased understanding of the characteristics of the genetic resources, as well as the seed systems farmers rely on for access to these resources. Maize is currently the most important grain crop in Sub Saharan Africa and adapting maize agriculture to climate change is essential to achieve improved food security on the continent. This project includes both a natural science perspective (genetic characterization and analysis) and a social science perspective (analyzing the role of the seed systems) on adaptation to climate change. The fieldwork for the current project is undertaken in semi-arid areas in South Sudan and in Tanzania.

Duration: 2009-2013.

Financing

  • Centre for Development and the Environment
Published Aug. 30, 2011 10:31 AM - Last modified Mar. 27, 2015 10:50 AM

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